3 Tips for Succession Planning in Higher Education

May 29, 2015

The American Council on Education reports that “58% of today's college presidents are over the age of 61." Succession planning has long been a practice in the corporate world, but has become increasingly essential in higher education. Here are some tips for effective practices.

 

1. Don’t wait until it’s too late. Succession planning should be considered a forethought, not an afterthought. Start before you need to. This isn’t an objective you are trying to meet, but a culture you are working to cultivate and doing that takes time.

 

2. Create a culture. Take a step back; effective succession planning is not narrowly focused on a few individuals or select roles, it’s an organization- wide endeavor. Take time to communicate your vision and obtain buy-in from key leaders who will help mobilize your strategy.

 

3. Encourage positive competition. Evaluate your reward structures. Take structural steps to facilitate identification and development of talent. Help your employees expand their views of career paths as has been successfully modeled in many start-up and tech industries with emphasison innovation and collaboration.

 

Help your employees expand their views of career paths as has been successfully modeled in many start-up and tech industries with emphasis on innovation and collaboration.

 

What steps have you taken toward higher education succession planning? What have been the easiest to implement and what has been the slowest to change? 

 

 

 

 

 

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